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Larry Coryell with The Wide Hive Players
To Be Released April 12th

“a true pioneer of rock-jazz fusion” – The New York Times

“the Godfather of Fusion” – Down Beat Magazine

Larry Coryell with The Wide Hive Players

Larry Coryell joins forces with The Wide Hive Players for 13 electrifying new tracks on this new album, to be released on April 12, 2011. Well-known for his driving tone and intricate flurries, Coryell delivers amazing and intense performances atop solid and expansive grooves established by The Wide Hive Players. The Players, now consisting of the enormously talented rhythm section of bassist Matt Montgomery (Calvin Keys and Variable Unit) and Thomas McCree (Lyrics Born’s drummer), horn players Mike Rinta (Sly Stone, Santana), Doug Rowan (Jazz Mafia) and Pianist Adam Shulman, all contribute to create a cohesive live sound, reminiscent of Coryell’s popular Offering (1972) or Eleveth House (1974) era. Primarily Jazz-Funk, the new album also glows with overtones of soul, blues, and has a definitive rock undercurrent. Overall the record is timeless, both reflective of past craftsmanship while remaining progressive and original.

As one of the pioneers of jazz-rock, Larry Coryell earned an important place in music history. He brought what amounted to a nearly alien sensibility to jazz electric guitar playing in the 1960s, a hard-edged, cutting tone that owed as much to blues, rock and even country as it did to earlier, smoother bop influences. Yet as a true eclectic, armed with a brilliant technique, he is comfortable in almost every style, covering almost every base from the most decibel-heavy, distortion-laden electric work to the most delicate, soothing, intricate lines on acoustic guitar.

The Wide Hive Players were perhaps best described by BBC Music Magazine: “The Wide Hive Players are a collective of talented in-house players from the San Francisco-based label Wide Hive Records. Producer and label-owner Gregory Howe, who clearly has a great ear, has penned a striking selection of soul-fused jazz tracks for his house band. From surprisingly fast drum intros, to gorgeous gutsy horn harmonics, which in the case of Mending Gravity have a curious dirge-like feel, this disk is topped off by Thomas McCree’s rippling B3 organ. Producer- led UK labels such as Tru Thoughts have drawn in a wide net of music fans- this Stateside band deserves to do likewise.”

..:: SOURCE: Giantstep.net ::..

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